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20121027
20121104
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 70 (some duplicates have been removed)
-- many of us congratulate ourselves on the movement of the 60's and we should. the civil rights movement was the greatest movement of my lifetime. feminism is why i am standing here. we were right to stop the vietnam war and we did the right thing. but the 60's were not an unbroken narrative of victory and happiness. they were kind of scary for a lot of people and not just white people. the crime did rise. there were urban riots, the fringe of the entire white movement got violent. divorce rates climbed. there was this sense the country was unraveling. and one of the things i think happened is the democrats were in charge. the democrats were engaged in the great society and the new round of government activism and so because they were in charge when these things seemed to fall apart they got blamed a lot of people i think blame the wrong things for the way the society seemed to fall apart. we were beginning to see offshore the industrialization. people didn't realize it but the blue collar jobs were going away so you have a constituency of people that then became republicans. the governm
churches and guarantees the civil right to commit to the one you love. while there are those trying to divide us, presidents obama and clinton stand with us. pastors, businesleaders, newspapers, democrats and republicans are all coming together for question 6. because it's about fairness-- treating everyone equal under the law. and who could be against that? >>> last check of the weather. we going to have a good election day? >> reporter: i think so. keep that extra coat handy because it will be chilly around here, my friend. >> all right. don't forget to set your clocks back. that's it for us >> you can always get the latest online at ab 2 news.com. if we're not here, you go there. see ya. it's oysternomics 101. you start with a u.s. senator named ben. by helping restore thousands of acres of oyster beds, he kept hundreds of oystermen on the job... which keeps wholesalers in business... and that means more delivery companies... making deliveries to more restaurants... which hire more workers. and that means more oystermen. it's like he's out here with us. he's my friend, ben. i hop
mean, a real movement like the labor movement or the anti-war movement on the civil right movement. a bunch of college kids waiving signs. we have to woo have a real movement that connects with people in their every day lives. that's the only way our side wins. thank you very much. >> wait. wait! we have time for one more question. >> you mentioned the power of money it is in churches very suspicious of the fundamentalist schurnlgs they say god wants you to be rich. that is for a part of the problem is. -- i have a needle. come on. >> guys? as a political junkie, i love reading the book. go out there and go to the book signing. buy it. thank you very much. [applause] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >>> in a couple of minutes we'll be back with more live coverage of the texas book festival. a panel on education reform is next. here's a look at upcoming book fairs and festivals. this weekend booktv is live from a texas book festival. it includes present tastes by many people. visit booktv.org for complete schedule of the events. >>> national press club book fair a
out of that civil rights movement era. she was talking about that no tired message. we can stand in those lines. you give us one day, we'll at that time one day. you give us voter i.d., we'll get an i.d. and i think that message is important. >> thank you to joy reid. and up next, i'll bring my panel back in on this issue of voter suppression and the backlash against it. could it turn out that the republicans have been their own great undoing. er ] take dayquil... [ ding! ] ...and spend time on the slopes. take alka-seltzer plus cold & cough... [ buzz! ] ...and spend time on the chair. for non-drowsy 6-symptom cold & flu relief. take dayquil. use nyquil... [ ding! ] ...and get longer nighttime cough relief. use alka-seltzer plus night cold & flu... [ coughs ] [ buzz! ] [ screams ] ...and you could find yourself... honey? ...on the couch. nyquil. 50% longer cough relief. that make kids happy. and even fewer that make moms happy too. with wholesome noodles and bite sized chicken, nothing brings you together like chicken noodle soup from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. [
blew up his campaign when he gav the libertarian answer on the 1964 civil rights act. suddenly he was tendering on that, john stossel. john: let's play some clips. romney says he ill repeal obamacare. but he wants to keep the popular parts. >> number one, pre-existing conditions are cered under my plan. john: that's popular. no one likes the idea that pre-existing conditions are covered, but that is not insurance, that is welfare. >> this is what our entire segment should beyond. of simply blowing off your obsession with drug legalization. health care. if we did not repeal obamacare in the next few years. john: repeal it but tepee expensive parts. cover the kids. >> 1,000 years of darkness. this is why you have to vote, i don't care if it's mickey mouse. or big bird. [laughter] but romney is far more free market than any recent republican candidates, including george bush. what romney is talking about here is the free-market. and as you say, pre-existing conditions are popular, like big bird. john: if everybody has to cover pre-isting conditions. >> let me finish. no one said ever
, not disclosing that information when they get to the polls. >> joe, poll watching is done by all party, civil rights groups you and i have been affiliated with. there's nothing wrong with it. why would someone want to purposely deceive their connection or affiliation with poll watching unless there's something they're going to do -- we're dealing with here that does not meet the eye? >> they might get one of those samuel l. jackson attitudes, you know, get out of my face mentality. first of all, that's understand what this is -- who they're directing this at. they will -- it will slow down, for example, the process. now, if you slow down the process -- look how long the lines are been for voting early. imagine what the lines will look like on election day. you slow down the process by having all of these challenges. number two, the elderly are targeted because they lie and they say that a poll worker can't come out and help an elderly who might be in a car or van who has a wheelchair. that's a lie. it slows down those who think they might be discouraged, because i have a record even though i'
to healthcare and pushed historic social policy with respect to immigration and civil rights. his challenger is supply-side reagan omics disciple who says he is fit to lead. he says he has a plan but when asked over and over for specifics can't produce. the arithmetic doesn't work. he's a governor who shares the social views he embraced to get to the primaries. he became a meyer pawn of the radical republican party, not a leader of it. on issue after issue the choice couldn't be more clear. not only because president obama is right to most of them but bus he leads on all of them. i think he could have handleed politics and policies differently, but he has been decisive strong and consistent. important qualities in a president. his opponent is a self-described etch-a-sketch. the antithesis of leadership. i had no choice but to laugh when i hear people argue that mitt romney would be a better leader than president obama. that romney would better connect with the american people. middle class workers who deserve a fair wage and a promising job. students and their parents who not only strife for
push. and they have been out there at the polls. the other thing is those civil rights groups and those groups dedicated to fighting voter suppression have been really campaigning to get people to the polls early and take advantage of early voting. especially in those states where those voter i.d. laws could be a sticking point. they want to give those people a chance in case there is a snag, a hiccup, they can still have time to get to the polls november 6th. >> and in case they don't know, 6 and 7, we're talking about same-sex marriage and we're talking about expanding gambling in prince george's county. >> yeah, two big, big contentious issues. two issues that both sides, the fors and against, have spent a ton of money, a ton of money, record-setting amounts of money, manpower, and so on. and so these issues really are driving people. people want to take their time in the booths. and so that's contributing to the long line as well as just the turnout. >> a lot to get through on those ballots. how about the district? what's going on in d.c.? because we're seeing long lines here too. >
series. he had come out on a series looking on civil-rights issues in america. that was a fundamental place for me to learn. i also worked on a documentary series for a long time. i learned by working in production and by immediately working on things of my own. i do think there is a benefit to the best practices, the thing that happens in an institution where you are not just struggling to make the thing. you are talking about it and you also have community and resources. if you can afford it, that is a powerful route. i happened to learn the hardest way possible, which is by working in production and not doing anything else. >> is that an issue here, the kind of methods, the institutions and the pattern and career that allows people to be trained to do watch-dog type stuff, whether they are journalists or do similar things, are those trying up? -- drying up? >> documentary films are interesting. in some ways, that still exists. in journalism, the apprentice ship model the newspaper used to offer is definitely going away. you have a staff of 10 and you might be able to mentor some nu
right on par with civil rights of the 1960's. let's end the drug wars. legalize marijuana now. [applause] let's repeal the patriot act. [cheers and applause] i would have never signed the national defense authorization act allowing for you and i as u.s. citizens to be arrested and detained without being charged. that's the reason we fought wars in this country. [cheers and applause] i promise to submit a balanced budget to congress in the year 2013. that is a 1.4 trillion reduction in federal spending. if we don't do this now, we are going to find ourselves in a monetary collapse and a monetary collapse very simply is when the dollars we have in our pockets don't buy a thing because of the acome anying inflation -- because of the accompanying inflation that goes along with every dollar we spend. thathe only candidate wants to eliminate income tax, eliminate corporate tax, abolish the i.r.s. and replace all of that with one federal consumption tax, the fair tax. i think it is the answer to our exports, it is the answer to american jobs. [applause] >> in what way way does the war on drugs
was happening with anti-war movement and what was happening with respect to the civil rights movement, and so i would hope that we're going to see more of that. >> how come? >> because young people, they communicate in a lot of different ways and everything moves so fast today that you can set the world on fire in a positive way just through a message that goes through the internet in a way that -- i had to go buy an album or a cartridge, you know. that's old school. >> if you're re-elected, you go into a second term, sasha and malia will be in the midst of their teens. what are you most worried about, malia getting a driver's license, malia going out on a date, or malia being on facebook? >> i'd worry about facebook right now, only because, look, i know the folks at facebook, obviously they've revolutionized the social networks, but malia because she's well known, you know, i'm very keen on her protecting her privacy. she can make her own decisions obviously later as she gets older. but right now, even just for security reasons, she doesn't have a facebook page. dates, that's fine because she
1964 civil rights act also prohibited employment discrimination on the basis of sex and that included pay. and basically the equal pay act hasn't been updated since then. so let's fast forward a minute to lily led better. the name that i know many of you are familiar with. and she had brought a lawsuit. she was in alabama working for almost 20 years at good yeer tire and rubber company. she learned from an anonymous note that that as one of very few women who held a particular position, she had been paid less than every other man in this position, including ones who were younger and had started way later on the job. she was disappointed and infuriated by the news. there was a policy that employees could not discuss pay amongst themselves, so she did not know until she got that an anonymous note. and when she learned about the years that she had been paid less, and the implications, because it may start small, but then when you think, over time, wage increases are often percentage increases of your salary. pension contributions are based on your salary. when you add a
, notably some of the nominations to the supreme court, and the soft attitude on civil rights to woo southern support." "the des moines register" endorsed nixon after, after the watergate burglary which occurred on june 17th of that election year. in june of the election year, the democratic party headquarters in washington was broken into in the middle of the night and instantly the entire world suspected richard nixon. in september of the election year, seven co-conspirators were indicted in the burglary including two men with strong ties to republican world. watergate got one line. one line in "the des moines register's" presidential endorsement in 1972. "we are disturbed by the watergate scandal and the evidence linking it with the white house." they were disturbed but not disturbed enough not to endorse richard milhous nixon. there wasn't a kid in my high school who didn't know that tricky dick was a crook, but "the des moines register" editorial board didn't know that. >> i'm not a crook. >> 19 days before "the des moines register" endorsed that crook, bob woodward and carl ber
from just the civil rights era. if you define it as being able to vote without barriers, it's still indanger. >> i wish we had more time. stay with us. much more ahead. look, if you have copd like me, you know it can be hard to breathe, and how that feels. copd includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. much more ahead. spiriva helps control my copd symptoms by keeping my airways open for 24 hours. plus, it reduces copd flare-ups. spiriva is the only once-daily inhaled copd maintenance treatment that does both. spiriva handihaler tiotropium bromide inhalation powder does not replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms. tell your doctor if you have kidney problems, glaucoma, trouble urinating, or an enlarged prostate. these may worsen with spiriva. discuss all medicines you take, even eye drops. stop taking spiriva and seek immediate medical help if your breathing suddenly worsens, your throat or tongue swells, you get hives, vision changes or eye pain, or problems passing urine. other side effects include dry mouth and constipation. nothing can reverse copd. spiriva helps me br
-man filibuster. 24 hours and 18 minutes he spoke against the 1957 civil rights bill. we remember strom thurmond today is one of the last of the jim crow demagogues and he was. he was not. but we forgot is that he was also one of the first of the sun belt conservatives. what i mean by that? as a sun belt, it's one of the major stories in the history of 20th century american politics. that is the flow of jobs, industry, resources and population from the states of the northeast and midwest, to the south and southwest in the post-world war ii period. southern states were recruiting industries. they were passing right to work laws. they were receiving from you and from the federal government to build military installations that attend the united states was involved in the cold war against the soviet union. states like mississippi, georgia, texas and southern california and arizona and north carolina are all transformed in the post-world war ii period by this historic shift in population and political influence. just think about it. the latest period from 1964 to 2008 could be thought of this kind of
but it is not even. here's the figure i want you to consider. from the u.s. civil rights commission which analyzed the in the dumpster, the ballots that were cast, if you are african-american, the chance of your ballot will get spoiled is 900% higher than if you are a white voter. that ain't no accident. it's an apartheid vote counting system we have in america. we are back to jim crow. not jim crow, it stopped or james crow systems analyst. that is how it is working. that is the new gimmick we are trying, that is happening and that is where the monies being spent and that's what makes the data trust dangerous. if they want to use it to pick out people who bowl and say bowlers made paul ryan fine but what if you are doing is mailing letters to soldiers on active duty with the game of challenging them, that is a crime according to bobby kennedy. and i have to say, while al gore grabbed his ankles in 2000 after he read, personally read my story that was breaking in england. this was before the supreme court ruled that thousands of like people were banished from the voter rolls in florida and after j
was a student body president there and a college quarterback. he got his start as a civil rights leader there. he was talking to students and reminding them of the sacrifices that their parents and grandparents made when the civil rights movements happened. in durham, he led a march of students to register to vote. they have sunday registration here in north carolina and early registration period there is a two-week period where you can actually vote. there is a two-week window where you can vote. later in the day, we had alicia keys, the singer and songwriter, who had about 1000 people in raleigh at a park edit for atomic late african- american neighborhood and was urging people to vote. in a suburb of raleigh, smithfield, in a tobacco warehouse which is a schumann this warehouse, we had about 5000 people show up to here pat mccrory, the republican for governor and chris christie. this is his third trip to the state. he has campaigned so often, he says he is thinking of moving here. he has campaigned for the republican ticket. host: i'm sure they would miss the governor dearly if he were to
. >> rebuttal. >> education is a civil rights issue of our generation. we are making progress in delaware in terms of narrowing the achievement gap. as we do this we want to do it by raising the achievements of all students. that is what we are doing. i am more excited about what is or nonpublic schools in delaware that i have ever been. -- in public schools in delaware than i have ever been. we can first place to plant five years ago. it is one thing to win a competition, and now we are making progress. announced two months ago for the school year ending in june, 10,000 more kids proficient in reading. >> i just want you to speak to the racial part. >> we narrowed that achievement gap. >> i am interested in the gaps. >> the investments we are making will help african-americans, it is our significant commitment to early childhood education. over the next five years, we will improve the percentage of high needs kids enrolled in a quality preschool. that is a game changer. if you ever met a 5-year-old that is a couple years behind, is a tragedy. the most effective investment we can make as
. rosa parks took the upper seat in montgomery, alabama. it did not create the civil- rights movement. it was a courageous act, but public opinion had changed before that. and the reason we know that public opinion change first is because rosa parks did the same thing 12 years earlier and nothing happened. in between, african-american soldiers came back from world war ii, southerners came back north with a different set of views, but jackie robinson began to play major-league baseball. the political process caught up later and it took a catalyst to spark the change. right now we are in one of those moments where public opinion is ahead of the political leadership. >> importantly, what rick says about people walking into thoughts and ideologies is true, but on the other hand every poll shows that people want our elected officials to compromise and get things done. that is the message. >> i am accompanying ed miller, from texas. karl rove is single-handedly responsible for turning my mother into an armchair pollster. every other day she calls up and says -- french, obama is up by three.
was a party for civil rights. >> exactly. >> caller: exactly. exactly, so they are trying to even pull something from 40, 50 years ago, to make up for what they don't have now. >> yeah. >> stephanie: david crosby of crosby stills and gnash -- >> what? >> stephanie: right? coming up on the "stephanie miller show." >> announcer: it's the "stephanie miller show." ♪ fruit just got cooler. fruit on one side, cool on the other. new ice breakers duo. a fruity, cool way to break the ice. ♪ >> announcer: stephanie miller. ♪ [ inaudible ] ♪ ♪ it's just a good vibration ♪ ♪ it's such a dreamy sensation ♪ >> stephanie: jacki, what are you doing? >> i'm working. >> what are you doing? >> i'm working. i'm coordinating with my fabulous producer lisa on what we're going to do in the news coming up in the next segment. >> stephanie: we're a bad influence. >> we are. >> stephanie: fifty minutes after the hour. that's what we do, we get people in trouble. >> do you know how many bouquets of flowers i have to buy her now. are you aware of all of the maybing up i'm going to h
. it began with the passage of the civil rights act in the '60s when the old dixiecrats like jesse helms left the democratic party because it became too racially inclusive and began gradually to take over the republican party. it's so dangerous to have one of our two big parties controlled by extremists because it makes people think that issues are equally divided when they are, in fact, not. they're 70-30 or 60-40. i think our long-term job is to take back the republican party. >> and just very quickly what is your prediction for tuesday? >> you know, it all depends who votes. if it is a lowered voter turnout, which obviously the governor and legislature of florida wants because they have cut the voting time almost in half and increased the ballot to 12 pages or something, then it will be an older, richer, whiter electorate. if it is a higher turnout, then it will be a more inclusive electorate. so a low turnout will elect romney-ryan. a high turnout, a true democratic turnout, will absolutely re-elect obama. >> yeah, and some states, from what i understand, the voting forums are like 30 pag
with civil rights. grant was the last of the lincoln republicans. one point i make is grant was the last president, the only president between abraham lincoln and lyndon johnson who took civil-rights for african-americans seriously. after grant left office the former slaves were left to the tender mercies of the majority of the south and quickly they were shoved to the side. >> don't ask the question if you don't want bill to answer it thoroughly. >> i do accept yes and no, multiple choice questions. >> we only have three minutes and there's a serious deadline so a brief question. >> you said you want to write history or biography. when i read your benjamin franklin biography you sound like a particle american, the first to the modern in some sense. very different people speaking. , who is the first american in the sense that he or she has attitudes like we do and writing biographies and things like that between 1620, and 1770. >> i am not sure i understand the question. who is the first american? >> who would you think after early colonization would have american attitudes that we recog
for one minute rebuttal. markell: psychiatry arne duncan says and i agree that education is a civil rights issue of our generation. we are making progress in delaware and closing the chief of the gatt which we keep a close eye on. the achievement gap we want to raise the achieve of all students, and that is exactly what we are doing. i am more excited about what is going on in public schools in delaware today than i've ever been. my wife and i. she went all the way through the schools right here in newark, but i'm more excited today. we came in first place in two and half years ago on race to the top. it's one thing to win a competition and now we are implementing it and making progress. we just announced two months ago that it ended in june 2000 market for proficient in reading and 9,000 more proficient enough in the year before. i want you to speak to the racial difference. we know that achievement gap. i thought you were asking about all the folks >> moderator: the only significant investment we are making we have a lot of african-american kids as our significant commitment to early chi
years. a pbs series. he had come out on a series looking on civil-rights issues in america. that was a fundamental place for me to learn. i also worked on a documentary series for a long time. i learned by working in production and by immediately working on things of my own. i do think there is a benefit to the best practices, the thing that happens in an institution where you are not just struggling to make the thing. you are talking about it and you also have community and resources. if you can afford it, that is a powerful route. i happened to learn the hardest way possible, which is by working in production and not doing anything else. >> is that an issue here, the kind of methods, the institutions and the pattern and career that allows people to be trained to do watch-dog type stuff, whether they are journalists or do similar things, are those drying up? >> documentary films are interesting. in some ways, that still exists. in journalism, the apprenticeship model the newspaper used to offer is definitely going away. you have a staff of 10 and you might be able to mento
of the series with the civil rights history in america. that was kind of a fundamental place from each of them also worked on a documentary series deal the following country but i learned by working in production and then bike immediately working on things of my own. i do think there is a benefit to that best practices thing that happens in institutions. where you're not just struggling to make the thing, you're actually talking about and you also have community and resources. i think if you can afford it, i think that it's certainly a powerful river i just happened to have learned the hard as we possible can which is used by working in production, not doing anything else. >> is the issue here the kind of method, the institutions and the sort of patterns of careers that allows people to train to the sort of watchdog type stuff, whether they were exactly journalists or did someone thinks? are those drawing up? i mean -- >> i mean, documentary film is interesting because in some ways i think that's a really exist at a british ship model is part of how you become a film maker. but i think in jour
. >> and very proud of that. they were very involved in the civil rights movement and they made me politically aware back then in the 1960s, and we're bringing back the four original members of the rascals. >> oh, great. >> good to talk to you, again. we failed to mention, we had talked before earlier in the show, so really appreciate it. we hope you get your power back and then everything works out for you and your family and your friends, and obviously we'll be supporting the money that you're going to be raising for awareness and to help those folks that are out there in the region. >> thank you. thank you, cnn, for supporting this very, very worthwhile cause. >> thank you, steven. appreciate it. >> here's what we're working on for this hour. >> just five days until the election. will it come down to ohio? plus this. >> manhattan, partially paralyzed after superstorm sandy flooded parts of the city. the fight for taxis, buses, and subway rides as people start returning to work. in blind taste tests, even ragu users chose prego. prego?! but i've bought ragu for years. [ thinking ] wonder wha
form of tax increase. we should lead by setting a high example for civil liberties and civil rights and due process and rule of law which is why we should close guantanamo and restore habeas corpus. i know he'll be able to help me turn the page on the ugly partisanship in washington so we can bring democrats and republicans together to pass an agenda that works for the american people. jon: well, that was then-senator barack obama promising big change during his 2008 successful presidential campaign. those promises you just heard pretty much went unfulfilled over the past four years including his vow to work with the other side of the aisle. our next guest says if president obama had lived up to his promises, things would look very different right now. fred barnes writing in "the weekly standard," quote: if he had done in his first term what he now vows to accomplish in his second term, he'd be this a far stronger position to win re-election next tuesday. he might have been a shoo-in. fred, you know, people have short memories when it comes to re-election time. take us back to four
just today its civil rights division will send 780 federal observers to monitor polling places. it's sending personnel to 51 jurisdictions in 23 states including six battleground states. cnn's crime and justice correspondent joe johns on the case for us from washington now. joe, i would ask you why they're doing this, is this something new? i know why they're doing it, but is it new? >> it's not new quite frankly, don. they've done this before. but when you think about it go over the numbers one more time. government is going to essentially 780 observers or justice department personnel, 51 jurisdictions, 23 states, six battleground states, what we found so interesting is the number of people they're sending to individual states. florida's number one on the list. government sending observers to a total of seven different counties in the sunshine state. state of pennsylvania is the runner-up with five different counties followed by ohio and texas each with four locations. and maricopa county, arizona, home of sheriff joe arpaio, also is going to have federal observers. >> yeah. and w
guaranteeing civil rights and searching for ways to live peacefully in the world. it means choosing dialogue over blame. respect over division. hope over fear. what made george a great public servant was not only his compassion and integrity, but it was his uncommon vision. he saw connections others did not see, like, the connection between political stability and hungry children. that vision became food for peace. and the mcgovern-adult education program. he also saw things sooner than others. in 1962, he said the most important issue of our time is the establishment of conditions for world peace. nine months into his first term, he gave his first speech on the non. -- vietname. -- vietnam. 1970, he warned about the dependence of the united states on fossil fuels. in 1984, he urged all of our american leadership to understand the complexity, challenges, and the volatility of circumstances in the middle east. i believe america would be a better place had george become president of the united states. [applause] that does not mean his campaign was a failure. far from it. the 1972 campaign open
but i do believe everyone is entitled to rights and that's why i support civil unions. >> moderator: next question to the kingman. >> this keep in via e-mail. how would you restructure the taxes? >> i talked about the need to make our code more simple and fair. we have way to many loopholes taken advantage of because it's school in they have lawyers that find these loopholes. that doesn't mean it's right. even if it's legal, we should change that because it's not helping create jobs. every day i meet with small business owners, and those guys, a lot of them just -- they come fresh from their work. they have oil on them and grease, and they can't afford to hire a whole wing of lawyers to find these loopholes? that's an example. and by the way, jets and oil companies and loopholes that allow companies to write off moving jobs overseas, those are primed to be closed. that helps our small businesses. we can lower rates for our guys and gals and hard-working families. so what i'm for is making sure we execute this process. i have voted to stepped -- extend out the current rates for a yea
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 70 (some duplicates have been removed)